Self-Assesssment Test

The same BOTOX that smooths facial wrinkles also prevents the muscle contractions that can trigger migraines.

BOTOX, highly diluted botulinium toxin, works to prevent migraine by blocking the release of a chemical in muscle cells that transmits the signal to contract to muscle fibers. Research into using BOTOX to treat migraines began after patients receiving it for other conditions reported improvement in their migraine symptoms. In 2010, after years of research and collecting clinical data, the FDA approved BOTOX for treating chronic migraines.

BOTOX is administered about every three months, relaxing the surrounding muscles so that they won’t compress the nerve and trigger a migraine. It is a potent drug, and we only recommend using it if other preventative treatment options haven’t helped you. It is generally only administered to patients who have at least 14 headaches a month, or don’t respond to other treatments.

BRUXISM TREATMENT

You can now decrease teeth grinding (Bruxism) with BOTOX. Bite splints worn at night can protect the teeth and TM joints from the intensity of grinding at night. However, BOTOX injection into specific muscles has been shown to decrease the intensity itself, thus reducing pain.

TRIGGER POINT TREATMENT

Trigger points are focal, hyperirritable spots located in a taut band of skeletal muscle. These knots produce pain locally and in a referred pattern. Acute trauma or repetitive microtrauma may lead to the development of stress on muscle fibers and the formation of trigger points. Trigger points may lead to face, neck and shoulder pain, tension headache, tinnitus, and temporomandibular joint pain. Palpation of the trigger point will elicit pain directly over the affected area and/or cause radiation of pain toward a zone of reference and a local twitch response. Trigger point injections using a combination of Botox and local anesthetic have been shown to be one of the most effective treatment modalities to inactivate trigger points and provide prompt relief of symptoms.

Here are a few questions you may want to ask yourself, to help determine if you have any symptoms:

Do you get an unusual amount of headaches?
Y
N
Do you have a grating, clicking or popping sound in either or both jaw joints, when you chew or open and close your mouth?
Y
N
Do you have pain or soreness in any of the following areas: jaw joints, upper jaw, lower jaw, side of neck, back of head, forehead, behind the eyes or temples?
Y
N
Do you have sensations of stuffiness, pressure or blockage in your ears? Is there excessive wax buildup?
Y
N
Do you ever have ringing, roaring, hissing or buzzing sounds in your ears?
Y
N
Do you ever feel dizzy or faint?
Y
N
Do your fingers, hands or arms sometimes tingle or go numb?
Y
N
Are you tired all the time, fatigue easily or consider yourself
chronically fatigued?
Y
N
Are there imprints of your teeth on the sides of your tongue?
Y
N
Does your tongue go between your teeth when you swallow?
Y
N
Do you have difficulty in chewing your food?
Y
N
Do you have any missing back teeth?
Y
N
Do you clench your teeth during the day or at night?
Y
N
Do you grind your teeth at night? (Ask your family.)
Y
N
Do you ever awaken with a headache?
Y
N
Have you ever had a whiplash injury?
Y
N
Have you ever experienced a blow to the chin, face or head?
Y
N
Have you reached the point where drugs no longer relieve your symptoms?
Y
N
Does chewing gum worsen your symptoms?
Y
N
Is it painful to stick your "pinky" fingers into your ears with your mouth open wide and then close your mouth while pressing forward with your "pinky" fingers?
Y
N
Does your jaw slide to the left or right when you open wide?
(Look in a mirror.)
Y
N
Are you unable to insert your first three fingers vertically into your mouth when it is open wide?
Y
N
Is your face crooked and not symmetrical?
Y
N

If you answered yes to some of these systoms, you may have a TMJ disorder (TMD) Consult your dentist for an examination.

Here are some ways you can visually check your TM joint:

  • Put your fingers inside your ears. Open and close several times. If the jaw clicks or cracks, or if you feel a grinding sensation.
  • While looking in a mirror, open very slowly, notice whether or not your jaw swings to one side while opening and closing. Is there any pain present?
  • Slide your jaw from side to side, make note of any pain you may experience.

Check for muscle sensitivity:

Place your fingers in front of your ears on the joint and apply pressure.

  • Also apply pressure to the cheek area
  • If you notice discomfort or pain have your jaw joint checked by a dentist who treats patients with jaw joint disorders!

Contact Us

 

Please do not submit any Protected Health Information (PHI).

(303) 758-4865
3540 S. Poplar Street, Suite 301 Denver, CO 80237